Spinach

Body

Spinach is a good source of vitamins A and C, iron, antioxidants and has twice as much fiber as other leafy greens. Plus, it can help in fighting off osteoporosis, heart disease, arthritis and several types of cancer.

How to cook spinach

Spinach is commonly eaten raw in a salad. But if you don’t want to eat spinach raw, here are some other ways it can be prepared.

Sautéed: Add clean spinach to sauté pan with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Cook spinach for three minutes.  Extra virgin olive oil is an excellent oil to use because it makes the nutrients in the greens more bioavailable.

Boiled: Add clean spinach to boiling water and boil for one minute.
Recipes:


Make-Ahead Spinach Lasagna in Crock Pot

Ingredients:
6-8 cups fresh baby spinach leaves
1/2 cup prepared pesto, from jar
3/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 (25.5 oz.) bottle pasta sauce
1 (8 oz.) package no-boil lasagna noodles (12 noodles)
2 cups sliced mushrooms
3/4 cup mozzarella cheese, shredded
3/4 cup provolone cheese, shredded
1 (15 oz.) carton part-skim ricotta
1 large egg, lightly beaten
1 (8 oz.) can tomato sauce

Directions:
Microwave spinach with a few tablespoons of water in a glass bowl for 3 minutes. Drain, cool, squeeze dry and chop lightly. Combine spinach, mushrooms, and pesto in bowl; stir and set aside. Combine mozzarella, provolone, ricotta and beaten egg in bowl, stirring well. Stir in 1/4 cup parmesan. Combine pasta sauce and tomato sauce in medium bowl. Spread 1 cup pasta sauce mixture in the bottom of a 6-quart oval electric slow cooker, coated with cooking spray, or oiled lightly. Arrange 3 noodles over pasta sauce mixture; top with 1 cup cheese and 1 cup spinach mixture. Repeat this layer again, ending with spinach mixture. Arrange 3 noodles then over spinach mixture, top with remaining 1 cup cheese and 1 cup pasta sauce. Place remaining 3 noodles over sauce; spread remaining sauce over noodles and sprinkle with remaining 1/2 cup parmesan. Cover and cook on low for 5 hours or until done.